My Blog

Brain Electrode Sensor

Brain Electrode Sensor

  • Monday, 13 May 2024
  • 0
  • 20
  • 0

Brain Electrode Sensor

A brain electrode sensor is a medical device that records electrical activity in the brain and sends the signals to a monitor.brain electrode sensor It is used to treat certain conditions, such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. Your neurologist will help you decide whether a brain electrode sensor is right for you. During the surgery, your surgeon places a thin wire lead with electrodes on the tips into a specific part of your brain. It also places a pulse generator under the skin of your chest near your collarbone, which contains the battery and control systems for the electrodes.

Electrode sensors are key to monitoring the molecular dynamics of neurotransmitters and other chemicals in the brain. Despite recent advances, the accurate identification of chemical signals is still challenging due to structurally similar molecules and noncovalent interactions. However, the rapid development of molecular, materials, and microfabrication technologies supports researchers in further reducing the size of electrodes for constructing highly sensitive in vivo electrochemical sensors and minimizing biological damage. Furthermore, coupling of fiber optic photometric techniques with various noninvasive in vivo analytical methods, such as MRI and PET, can greatly enhance the understanding of brain mechanisms.

The research team led by Associate Professor Toshinori Fujie at Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed a flexible sensor that can record localized brain signals, such as electrical potential differences (ECoG) and local field potentials (LFP), with high accuracy. It is able to do so by using ultra-thin, clinical-grade electrodes that are much smaller than conventional clinical electrodes.

These ultra-thin electrodes are made of flexible printed electronics, which closely match the mechanical properties of brain tissue. They are formed by layering a flexible material, such as polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS), with a gold inkjet print layer to make it conductive. The electrodes have an array of laser-perforated microchannels that serve as measurement and stimulation points.

The electrodes can be attached to the skull and connected to a computer for recording. They can also be implanted directly into the brain to stimulate specific regions. They are also compatible with other brain stimulation technologies, such as deep-brain stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

One challenge for brain electrode sensors is that they can sometimes cause bioinflammatory reactions in the brain when rigid electrodes cut through it. By increasing the flexibility of electrodes and reducing their sizes, researchers have been able to reduce bioinflammatory responses. For example, Tian's group used carbon fiber electrodes with a diameter of only 8 mm to monitor oxygen concentration changes in the brain and LFP signals simultaneously. In addition, their innovative approach to modifying enzymes on the surface of the electrodes enables them to detect low-level chemical signals such as DA in vivo. This method may be an efficient solution to overcome the limitations of traditional pharmacologically tagged enzyme-based sensing. In the future, it is expected that these flexible sensors will be incorporated into a wider range of biomedical applications. In order to do so, the sensors will need to be more durable and stable, as well as capable of detecting a greater number of different substances.

0users like this.

Leave a Reply